Saskatchewan History Online

Showcasing amazing images from Saskatchewan's past.
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moonshot5:

Fort Qu’appelle Saskatchewan 1910 

moonshot5:

Gainborough , Saskatchewan

moonshot5:

Saskatchewan,Canada-Carrying Grain to the Elevators

(via historiacanada)

moonshot5:

Swift Current , Saskatchewan. 

moonshot5:

Saskatchewan homestead

framingcanada:

This Is The First Ever Photo Of Canada (via This Is The First Ever Photo Of Canada)

Behold the first photograph ever captured in the Great White North.

Taken in 1840 (yes, technically before Canada was actually a country, but stop being so persnickety), the picture of Niagara Falls was discovered in 1997 at Newcastle University in England, where it had been sitting forgotten in the Special Collections of the school’s library. Taken by British businessman Hugh Lee Pattinson on a trip to Canada, it was given to the school by his family.

The image is a daguerreotype, an early form of photograph that required a long exposure time. The picture took around 10 minutes to capture, leading many to suggest the figure in the bottom left corner is Pattinson himself.

The photo went viral on Reddit this week, racking up tens of thousands of views. Clever Redditors even took the time to enhance the image and flip it. The original was inverted as part of the daguerreotype process.

thefortmuseum:

Greater sage grouse protection plan released

Emergency order won’t be enough to save rare, iconic birds, environmental groups say

By Margo McDiarmid, CBC News Posted: Dec 04, 2013 12:29 PM MT

The Canadian government is attempting to save the quickly disappearing greater sage grouse by restricting construction and loud industrial noise near its habitat during certain times of the year.

The restrictions are part of an emergency order for the protection of the endangered bird that is now officially in place. It’s the first time that such an order has been issued under Canada’s Species at Risk Act.

Environment Canada announced in September it would issue the order in an attempt to protect the shy and nervous bird that lives in southeastern Alberta and Saskatchewan.

There are only about 150 sage grouse left and it’s likely the bird will disappear from Canada in five years if steps aren’t taken to protect it. The bird lives in long prairie grass, which has been largely destroyed over the last century by agriculture and oil and gas development.

tourismsaskatchewan:

101 Grey Cup Round-Up

The Celebration in Rider Nation was a non-stop party and here’s a bit of a round up!

moonshot5:

Wilkie , Saskatchewan

moonshot5:

 Prince Albert,  Sask ,  c1910